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Course Description

Biblical Studies Required Courses

B111A - Biblical Studies I: Torah and Former Prophets
This first required biblical studies course introduces students to critical approaches to the study of the Torah (Genesis – Deuteronomy) and Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) that have been important in biblical scholarship over the last 150 years.

B111B - Biblical Studies I: Torah and the Former Prophets
This first required biblical studies course introduces students to critical approaches to the study of the Torah (Genesis – Deuteronomy) and Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) that have been important in biblical scholarship over the last 150 years.

B112A - Biblical Studies II
The course will provide a general introduction to the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, The Book of the Twelve) and the Writings (with emphasis on the Psalms’, Proverbs’; Job, and the Five Scrolls). Attention will be given to historical context, literary style, and canonical shape, as well as a theological appropriation of the material for teaching and preaching in the church.

B112B - Biblical Studies II - The Latter Prophets and Writings
The course will provide a general introduction to the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, The Book of the Twelve) and the Writings (with emphasis on the Psalms’, Proverbs’; Job, and the Five Scrolls). Attention will be given to historical context, literary style, and canonical shape, as well as a theological appropriation of the material for teaching and preaching in the church.

B115A - Biblical Studies III: The Gospels and Revelation
Biblical Studies III surveys the content and issues in interpretation of the canonical gospels, and the book of Revelation. It is a course in which students explore the historical origins and sources of these writings, as well as engage them via various contemporary interpretive approaches. In conjunction with Biblical Studies I, II, and IV the course seeks to hone the interpretive skills of students, both with a depth of appreciation for the contexts and content of the Biblical writings, and an understanding of how to most appropriately and faithfully interpret the Biblical writings for the practice of ministry in their own contexts of the Church today.

B115B - Biblical Studies III: The Gospels and Revelation
Biblical Studies III surveys the content and issues in interpretation of the canonical gospels, and the book of Revelation. It is a course in which students explore the historical origins and sources of these writings, as well as engage them via various contemporary interpretive approaches. In conjunction with Biblical Studies I, II, and IV the course seeks to hone the interpretive skills of students, both with a depth of appreciation for the contexts and content of the Biblical writings, and an understanding of how to most appropriately and faithfully interpret the Biblical writings for the practice of ministry in their own contexts of the Church today.

B116 - Biblical Studies IV: Paul and the Interpreters of Paul
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B116A - Biblical Studies IV: Paul and the Interpreters of Paul
More than half of the New Testament is devoted to texts either written by Paul or in his name. This course offers an introduction to the figure of Paul in his social and historical context, and to the interpretation of his letters. It also explores how the figure of Paul (after his martyrdom) became an authority for ministry and the leadership of the church in the writings of the interpreters of Paul in the late first and early second century. The course seeks to engage students in their imaginations for ministry – attending to Paul’s relationship with his churches, his negotiation of authority in his leadership and his reliance upon and freedom within the traditions of his early Jewish religious heritage in communicating his understanding of the good news of Jesus Christ. Additionally, the course will explore how the interpreters of Paul represent the diversity of the early church as it developed within the Greco-Roman world, and how Paul’s writings and those of his interpreters raise questions about the nature of religious authority, the meaning of “scripture,” and the establishing of the canon. Finally, the course will offer the opportunity to explore how the interpretation of Paul in the overall life of the church has been a contested enterprise, particularly around matters of human freedom and justice related to gender, race, class and human sexuality.

B116B - Biblical Studies IV: Paul and the Interpreters of Paul
More than half of the New Testament is devoted to texts either written by Paul or in his name. This course offers an introduction to the figure of Paul in his social and historical context, and to the interpretation of his letters. It also explores how the figure of Paul (after his martyrdom) became an authority for ministry and the leadership of the church in the writings of the interpreters of Paul in the late first and early second century. The course seeks to engage students in their imaginations for ministry – attending to Paul’s relationship with his churches, his negotiation of authority in his leadership and his reliance upon and freedom within the traditions of his early Jewish religious heritage in communicating his understanding of the good news of Jesus Christ. Additionally, the course will explore how the interpreters of Paul represent the diversity of the early church as it developed within the Greco-Roman world, and how Paul’s writings and those of his interpreters raise questions about the nature of religious authority, the meaning of “scripture,” and the establishing of the canon. Finally, the course will offer the opportunity to explore how the interpretation of Paul in the overall life of the church has been a contested enterprise, particularly around matters of human freedom and justice related to gender, race, class and human sexuality.